Ladybugs Galore


I have a deep philosophical question.  Deeper than asking about the meaning of life, or why we are here on earth, or where we go after our death.  My question is deep.  Real deep.  Ready for it?  Okay.  Here goes.

Why in the world are there so many uber creative people with creativity oozing from every pore and my creativity is as plentiful as water and shade in Death Valley?  In the middle of the day?  In the middle of July?  Huh?  Will you answer me that?

I see you are speechless.  Me, too.

Amanda is one of those uber creative women.  And one of her loves is creating lady bug crafts — which I was smitten with as soon as I saw them.  You will be, too! (Thank you, Amanda, for letting me use the picture of your cutie bugs for my posting!  Not only is she creative, she is also gracious for sharing this picture.)

My favorite ladybug craft is the twirling paper ladybugs.  This would be a great activity to do with your grandchildren.

(We pause here for a station identification.  Recently, I realized that I use the word ‘great’ alot.  Like 596,4029.2 times within the last three posts that I’ve written.  Well, maybe not THAT many . . . But almost. I really must flee to the arms of Roget’s Thesaurus to find a replacement.  Now, back to our regularly scheduled program.)

These neat-o keen-o bugs are easy to make and would delight any grandchild.  They are also cheap.  Cheap is nice and, when combined with easy, it makes for a winner of an activity.  (Winner — how’s that for replacing the word ‘great?’)

Lest you get complacent with just one mere ladybug activity, you’ve just GOT to check out the others.  Sheesh, you could take a whole week and make a gaggle of these li’l darlin’s and have them all over your house.  (If your grandchildren live far away from you, you could send the materials and directions for the activities to your grandchildren.  That would give them lots of fun to do now that school is out for the summer.)

  • Paper plate ladybugs (The ones pictured above.)
  • Ladybug rocks (If you need rocks, let me know.  I’d be happy to send you some — straight out of my flower garden!)
  • Plastic lid ladybugs (Start saving the plastic lids off milk jugs, et. al.)
  • Ladybug hat (Be sure to take pictures of your grand kiddos wearing their hat!)
  • Recycled ladybug jar (Filled with candy a healthy treat, this jar will be a hit for a grandchild to take home.

You could make sugar cookie ladybugs, paint a ladybug on a t-shirt or apron, or make a construction paper ladybug bookmark.  You could draw a ladybug on a popcicle stick to put in a potted plant.

What other ladybug crafts have you done with your grandchildren?

Thanks for sharing!